Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Money Secrets of the Amish


I love to check books out from the library. We visit several times a month. My latest read was very good. I read it in a couple of days, it was that interesting. The title is Money Secrets of the Amish  by Lorilee Craker.
For the most part I found this very informational. The only thing I didn't care for was the author's personal action plans at the end of each chapter. Some were so simplistic that I skipped them. But what really held my interest was the constant focus on simplicity and their constant focus on money. Not in a bad way but how their actions can preserve their money.

My favorite chapter was on using things up, wearing things out, making do and doing without. It really hit home with me. For everything you make last and learn to live without or discover a substitute for, it equates to money in your pocket. Say you break your yard rake, which I have, but then have your husband screw on the handle again and repair it, it is $15 in my pocket. I have been eyeing a new rake at our local hardware store, knowing ours is sort of on its last legs. Well my new philosophy is making the rake last to its dying day. Repair it as long as we can and it is $15 I am ahead. Money still in my pocket.

I also loved their simple take on holiday gifts. They usually consist of useful needed items but I think I am really going to enact some of this in our holiday gift giving. Not only will it simplify things for me, but will cut down on the cost of Christmas. My older kids are so hard to buy for so I think some gift cards and maybe a couple of things to open while Quinn is so young you could wrap some very inexpensive items and she would be thrilled.

The Amish thoughts on thrift extend to all areas of their lives and I already implement a lot of these ideas as well but I am always looking for more areas I can improve on and continued motivation on my frugal quest.

27 comments:

Cozy Little House said...

You're talking the language I need to hear! And adapt to. If you can't resurrect that rake, take the rake part and make something inventive with it. Then at least it will be repurposed.
Brenda

Holly said...

I feel the same way, getting back to the more simple times. Make do or do without, love it.

Emily Fay said...

I am so glad you reviewed this book - as I have had my eye on it for awhile. Thanks! I am going to have to purchase this :) Have a lovely day!

Josanne said...

I've seen this book, and have wondered about it, but have yet to buy it, as I have a gazillion books I still need to read already!
But where I live, we have quite a few Amish communities around us, and we do know a few that are extremely well off. They do have some practices that definitely work for keeping more of your money, instead of watching every penny disappear!

Julie Harward said...

That saying...about using things up...has been used in every pioneer family and right up to my parents and grandparents. It has recently come back in because of the economy I think. :D

gbarcw said...

On a different note, I just wanted to let you know I received my wonderful package over the weekend. I cannot wait to use the beautiful vintage trays and the cutest ever kitchen towel. Thanks again. I love being the contest winner!

~Carla~ said...

I'm reading Amish Peace by Suzanne Woods Fisher & am really enjoying it as well. You would probably like it too! :)

Rhonda said...

thank you for sharing this, I am going to look on Amazon. This sounds like something that might help with a situation we just found ourselves in.

Ricki Jill Treleaven said...

This sounds like a very good read, Elaine. Thanks for linking-up! I like the way the Amish are such good stewards (like you said) in so many areas.

I went by the library today, and I ended up reserving several new titles. I hope I get them soon! I finished a great book yesterday because I had finished all my work, and it was so dark I couldn't paint, and the internet was sketchy!

Thanks for the well-written review.

xoxoxoxo,
Ricki Jill

MommaHen said...

I really try to live by the same moto. Mostly, because I have to. I try to weigh: Do I want to eat out or do I want to make lots of healthy homemade meals so we can eat healthy, lose weight, and be able to buy a new pair of jeans! haha. I'll have to try and find this book. Looks like a great read!

The Chickens' Auntie said...

What a simple philosophy -- use it up, wear it out, make do and do without! We live in such a disposable society that people forget what it's like to make something last! Thanks for this post -- I think I'll add that book to my library list.

Leo x said...

in Pam Young's good book she taught me a really good philosophy. If you make do and mend something (like your rake) take the $15 you would have spent on a new rake and put it into a savings account or piggy bank. If you make breakfast at home instead of going out for breakfast, put the money you would have spent into the piggy bank too. After a while you will have a savings nest egg and it's all money you have proudly saved by making things last and using them till their last dying breath. Intersting concept huh?

Mama Hen said...

Hi! I came over from Raising Homemakers. I have been wanting to read this book.

By the way, I am having a little Amish giveaway over at my blog is you are interested!

deb said...

ok I need this book....I love books on the Amish AND on frugalness....its right down my alley!!!!!

Alicia said...

It's the "doing without" part that is always hardest for me! I think reading books like this is always a good reminder and motivator to make the right "hard" financial choices. :)
Thanks for linking up to Alicia's Homemaking!

Leslie said...

wow.. I havent seen that book around but now I will be looking for it.
Have a great Friday

Precious said...

The simple life has always been the best. Thanks for sharing the review on the book. I will definitely be checking it out of the library. You might also like:

The American Frugal Housewife by Lydia Maria Francis Child

Precious

Tammy at Tammy Loves Dishes said...

Thanks for sharing this review. I'm off to check our library to see if we have this book so I can reserve it.

marshamellow-ramblingabout said...

Actually listened to this book on CD from the library. Had some good basic ideas. Not sure I would buy it but borrowing either book or CDs from library is worth the read. More or less reinforced some frugal ideas we may already have.

Diann said...

This is the concept that both Troy and I grew up with. We have repaired our coffee maker so many times as well as our toaster. Replacing the handles on ax's, shovels, rakes and other things is something we alway have done. I am going to have to check out this book. Sounds like something I would enjoy reading. thanks for sharing with us at TF. Have a fun weekend!

joyceandnorm said...

Stopping by from TNAT.

We love the library! Sounds like an interesting read. I'm all for simple and useful Christmas gifts.

Smallgood said...

I like that philosophy and thinking, especially about the gifts. Found you via What We've Been Reading party.

Bonnie said...

What a fascinating book! Thanks so much for linking up this month! I'm your newest follower!

~ ~ Ahrisha ~ ~ said...

Ahhh, the simple life. I live in Amish country and I love the sound of their horse and buggys on the road past the house.
~ ~Ahrisha~ ~

Sherry said...

Yes, I think this would be a great read. So often we think what can we get, but I know I don't equate that to what I have to spend (lose) to get it. Great post Elaine! Thanks for linking it to Home Sweet Home!
Sherry

acorn hollow said...

For Christmas we yard sale and thrift all year. and fill each others stockings with only things bought in that way. We find brand new things send away for free samples etc. We find the most amazing things.
Cathy

Mary said...

Hi, just came across this post - our local library doesn't have the book so I asked them to order it, hope they will!

Mary @ Redo 101

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