Monday, May 21, 2012

Teaching Girls About the Little Things

   When I was a teenager and getting ready to start shaving, my mom was old school about it. She handed me one of those scary razors, you know the ones with all the blades and no instruction on how to use it. I proceeded to shave off every bit of skin along the back of my ankle. I did not know to keep the leg stretched out. It bled for hours.
 
   Now that I have four daughters, I have taken a different approach. When a sensitive topic comes up and I need to teach them about how to deal with it, I just lay it all out for them. I use correct terms and give them as much info as is needed. I want them to feel comfortable coming to me with questions, and they know I am always here if they have concerns.
 
   Shaving is a big deal in our house. I allowed my girls to start shaving when they asked to. I did not see any need to hold them off if it was something that was starting to embarrass them. I would show them exactly how to hold the razor and to use shave cream if desired. Of course I made sure they knew to always hold their skin nice and taut so as to not make the mistake I did.
 
   There are always several cans of women's shave cream in the shower and numerous razors. My poor husband. We recently were able to try the Venus Embrace razor. Hands down my girls favorite. It has five blades for a close, comfortable shave and their favorite, the Ribbon of Moisture for a smooth glide and smooth legs.
 
   No one will shave without their favorite shave cream and we love the Satin Care Passionista  Fruit. It has a sparkling, fruity scent and my girls loved it. 
   
   With daughters aged 20, 17, 14  and three, there will be a lot of shaving and other beauty products in the shower for many years to come. Sorry hubby.
 
   Share a tip for tackling tough "firsts" conversations with your kids to be entered for a chance to win a $50 Visa gift card, courtesy of BlogHer and Venus!
 
Rules:
No duplicate comments. You may receive (2) total entries by selecting from the following entry methods: a) Leave a comment in response to the sweepstakes prompt on this post b) Tweet about this promotion and leave the URL to that tweet in a comment on this post c) Blog about this promotion and leave the URL to that post in a comment on this post d) For those with no Twitter or blog, read the official rules to learn about an alternate form of entry. This giveaway is open to US Residents age 18 or older. Winners will be selected via random draw, and will be notified by e-mail. You have 72 hours to get back to me, otherwise a new winner will be selected.
The Official Rules are available here.
 
This sweepstakes runs from 5/21 - 6/30.
 
Be sure to visit the Venus Brand feature page on BlogHer.com where you can read other bloggers’ reviews and find more chances to win!  If you have a first-time shaver in your home, you should check out some of these great tips from Venus Embrace!

80 comments:

Rosa said...

I believe good communication and flexibility will help any parent to face their children's growing up milestones.

Mami2jcn said...

My daughter is too young still (she’s 2) but I remember my mom reading “Where do I come from?” with me to teach me about the facts of life.

mami2jcn at gmail dot com

Mami2jcn said...

tweet:

https://twitter.com/#!/mami2jcn/status/204617971325341696

Cindy said...

Ha! I remember shaving the skin off my legs too! I still have the scars. I just have boys, so their dad has done the practical tutoring. We both talk about the rest so they will be comfortable coming to us about anything.

Teresa said...

I don't have any kids so I will never have to have any of those talks. I don't think the dogs care! lol. I remember that my mom was very reserved about any of these things. Just a fast lesson on how to shave. Booklets about periods, ect. Just a very fast lesson and then she was out of there! I think it embarrassed her. First daughter and I don't think she knew how to handle it. 40 some years ago things were not discussed. At least in our family. I am so glad that mom's can be more open with their daughters now.

akronugurl said...

my daughter is only 4 mos old but when gets older im going to teach her to be honest and to be happy !

freebiel0ve@yahoo.com

akronugurl said...

https://twitter.com/#!/akronugurl/status/204642545974771716

freebiel0ve@yahoo.com

FreeIndeed said...

just be straight-forward, honest, and keep a sense of humor when talking with your kids
thepryfamily@gmail.com

FreeIndeed said...

https://twitter.com/#!/thepryfamily2/status/204722452432031746

thepryfamily@gmail.com

kellyr78 said...

My daughter is only 4, but I keep my explanations simple and always remind her how pretty and smart she is!

KellywcuATyahooDOTcom

kellyr78 said...

tweeted
https://twitter.com/kellydsaver/status/204728807834386432
kellywcuATyahooDOTcom

NanaDiana said...

I was always open and honest with my girls, too. My Mother told me NOTHING..and I had to learn from friends. xo Diana

Judy B. said...

Start with a trusting relationship from early on and look at it as an exciting opportunity

Judy B. said...

tweet
https://twitter.com/BBirdie2/status/204795944766676992

Frugal Mom from California said...

I think it's important to be open and honest with your kids when talking about their bodies.

elena150980@Yahoo.com

Frugal Mom from California said...

https://twitter.com/ElenaIstomina/status/204808265249460224

elena150980@yahoo.com

dorothy erdely said...

i have to agree with everyone else - just be open & honest & talk. communication is so important to kids. i remember the day my daughter 1st shaved her legs -- great scrapbook pictures, even of the hair on the bottom of the tub!!!

Grace said...

Tag team it. Although it may seem like it's easier to talk about the embarrassing stuff one on one, sometimes the opposite is true. The subject can be less uncomfortable with another close relative involved. You break that mom/kid dynamic (The one where they will listen to anyone but Mom)that sometimes makes communication hard.

I helped my sister explain menstruation to my nine year old niece a couple of weeks ago and it was very comfortable with the three of us sitting at the kitchen table getting dinner ready and talking about what is happening to her and the changes she is going through and relating that to ourselves and then to all women so she could see the bigger picture and not take it all so personally.

Kelly Massman said...

I don't have any teenage girls--just a boy, but I think it is good to be interested in their lives and be willing to make time for them... Thanks for a chance to win and have a great day!
kmassmanATgmailDOTcom

Amy said...

It is certainly not easy to be a parent, especially tackling those tough “first” conversations with my kids. But the best way I prefer is openness and be honest and straight forward. That’s the way I preferred to be treated, so, I’ll do the same with my kids.

Amy [at] utry [dot] it

Amy said...

tweeted: https://twitter.com/uTry_it/status/205948019571556352
Amy [at] utry [dot] it

B. Wilson said...

never been in those shoes, but I'm gonna say, be honest!
--Brandy
fosterbrandy(at)msn(dot)com

Tiffany Winner said...

I think if you have a good relationship with your kids as they're growing up, all important conversations will come much more naturally.
thismomwins@gmail.com

Tiffany Winner said...

I tweeted: https://twitter.com/thismomwins2/status/206470132313227265
thismomwins@gmail.com

Rebecca Graham said...

Be honest and be a good listener too.

rhoneygtn at yahoo dot com

JC said...

Be honest and realistic are best tips from my experience.
tcarolinep at gmail dot com

JC said...

https://twitter.com/tcarolinep/status/206956661120831488

Anash said...

take it slow and answer questions! Thanks for a super giveaway!
My email: anashct1 [at] yahoo [dot] com

Anash said...

Tweeted:
https://twitter.com/anashct3/status/208178258150305792
Thanks for the chance to win!
email: anashct1 [at] yahoo [dot] com

Tina said...

My daughter is too young now. I’m going to teach her just be herself and honest
merleandtina@yahoo.com

Tina said...

https://twitter.com/HappyTina0115/status/208273913954836481
merleandtina@yahoo.com

MANDY83 said...

I would say to be patient and understanding. Let them know you are listening!

pokergrl8 at gmail.com

MANDY83 said...

https://twitter.com/aes529/status/208313556121296896


pokergrl8 at gmail.com

Mon_Cherie said...

I laughed reading your post because,
yes, I did the same thing with that scary razor! I remember having to beg my mom, who was VERY old school and wanted me to wait until I was 16. Ummm, no way Mom, I was being called Grape Ape in gym at 13-Italian and almost 5 already (I am almost 6' now). I went to my Aunt's for a weekend, showed her my legs and poof, we shaved them. Wow, remember how great that felt!?
I definetly didn't do the same with my daughter. When she asked, we did it right. I taught her with or without shaving cream and how to make sure NEVER to dry shave.
My daughter and I have a very close relationship because she knows I will tell it like it is...very important, or they will just learn it from someone else and perhaps the wrong way.
BUT always remember that you are MOM and not a friend (that comes later when they are on their own-I am there now)

Mon_Cherie said...

I am hoping this is the right tweet:
https://twitter.com/InventingMyself/status/210107527763996673

sweepingnews(at)gmail(dot)com

Cozy Little House said...

I had no one around to help me with this. Your girls are so lucky!
Brenda

Deb Anderson said...

blog post
http://tnshadylady.blogspot.com/2012/06/more-great-bloghercom-giveaways.html

Deb Anderson said...

tweet
http://twitter.com/tnshadylady/status/211814496560365569

StephanieC said...

talking over food so you have time to process while you chew! scg00387 at yahoo dot com

StephanieC said...

https://twitter.com/DesMoinesDealin/status/211872828411224065 scg00387 at yahoo dot com

Calli said...

My tip is to be calm and treat your child with respect; treating them like an adult will allow them the choice of starting to act like an adult.
geminicalli at yahoo dot com

chambanachik said...

My daughter is only (almost) two, so we haven't had those big conversations yet, but when we do, I hope to be honest and listen well.

chambanachik@gmail.com

Wanda said...

My biggest word of advice? Don't flip!
Kids are anxious about so much and hairy legs can put a girl over the top with embarrassment!

I have two girls 17 & 19 and they cost a fortune in shaving products...look out with 4!! ;)

cw said...

just try to be open and honest about everything so it doesn't feel awkward or embarassing....instead it is just part of life.

tara1965 said...

tweeted https://twitter.com/kj20082006/status/214074085565673472

tara1965 said...

talking in the car is a great place

ms-texas said...

things like shaving are a fact of life and you just have to be open and honest with your daughter

debbiebellows (at) gmail (dot) com

ms-texas said...

i tweeted here:

https://twitter.com/bellows22/status/214851651511660544

debbiebellows (at) gmail (dot) com

Karina said...

my daughter is still a baby so I haven't had to have any "talks" with her yet

karinaroselee at gmail dot com

Karina said...

https://twitter.com/karinaroselee/status/215192125803986944

karinaroselee at gmail dot com

Tabathia said...

Be honest in your approach and don't be embarrassed be willing to demonstrate some things

tbarrettno1 at gmail dot com

Tabathia said...

tweet
https://twitter.com/ChelleB36/status/215223040714342400
tbarrettno1 at gmail dot com

Christina said...

Tackling tough “firsts” conversations with my kids is not too easy, be honest and have the conversation with them personally and share my past experience, they would be interested to listen and learn.

ctong2[at]gmail[dot]com

Christina said...

I tweeted about this promotion: https://twitter.com/ctong2/status/215723422343376897

ctong2[at]gmail[dot]com

Lindsay said...

Fake it til you make it. Even if you are uncomfortable during one of those "first" convos, play it cool. The minute you get weird, they get weird.

Lindsay said...

Tweeted-https://twitter.com/lmpick/status/215975686379286528

sy said...

tweet: https://twitter.com/syytta/status/216441520071520256
songyueyu at gmail

Cheryl Purviance said...

I'm glad my girls are all grown up!


lady_phoenix39 at yahoo.com

Cheryl Purviance said...

https://twitter.com/CptFussybuckets/status/216630723673718784

lady_phoenix39 at yahoo.com

donnadanielle said...

I still have a scar from when I "borrowed" my mother's razor and cut myself on the back of the knee! I plan on teaching my children the correct way like you!

ddaniellebaker at yahoo.com

Gina M Maddox said...

I think being open with your kids is my best advice. Thanks for the chance to win!
gina.m.maddox (at) gmail (dot) com

Gina M Maddox said...

tweet-https://twitter.com/CrazyItalian0/status/217302339885871104

gina.m.maddox (at) gmail (dot) com

Always Something said...

Being open, honest, and comfortable with talking to your daughter is the best way to communicate about those firsts, or anything else.

Betty C said...

Start early and let them know that no subject is off limits. Introduce difficult subjects when everyone is most relaxed.

willitara [at] gmail [dot] com

MCantu1019 said...

Always be honest no matter what the first.
MCantu1019 at aol dot com

Kerry said...

When we have one of those 'firsts conversations', I just make sure my kids know that they can ask me any questions.
nuthouse(at)centurytel(dot)net

Kerry said...

tweeted: https://twitter.com/KerryBishop/status/218482331357413376
nuthouse(at)centurytel(dot)net

Ashley T. said...

I don't have any kids yet so don't have any tips for tackling firsts!

ajoy1332 at yahoo dot com

Ashley T. said...

https://twitter.com/ajoy1332/status/218503317410676736

ajoy1332 at yahoo dot com

coriwestphal said...

Honesty is the best policy. Don't sugarcoat. Be serious and straightforward and keep it simple!

coriwestphal at msn dot com

coriwestphal said...

Tweet: http://twitter.com/coriwestphal/statuses/218542266787176448

coriwestphal at msn dot com

Betty C said...

Tweet - https://twitter.com/willitara/status/218610513582624768

willitara [at] gmail [dot] com

Jammie Morey said...

we are very open with our daughter so those first come a bit easy. sweepmorey at gmail dot com

Jammie Morey said...

tweeted https://twitter.com/mommysdizzy/status/218815813229096962

Deb said...

My best tip is to approach the conversation and answer only the questions your child has at the time - don't overwhelm them with information they may not be ready to deal with.

angie lilly said...

I don't have kids, but one of the 1sts that I remember and love from my own childhood was the first time I let my now hubby then boyfriend (we met when I was 16) go to 2nd base. LOL After it happened, I went to my mom and asked her if it made me easy...she smiled and laughed and said "did it feel right? did you enjoy it?" I said yes and she said "then its OK and no you aren't easy." LOL
Angie
14earth at gmail dot com

angie lilly said...

I tweeted here: https://twitter.com/MsTofuFairy/status/219050147827560449
Angie
14earth at gmail dot com

Julie said...

My daughter is a teenager...quite honestly I was "nervous" about tough
first conversation...took the plunge and found she wanted to know things..this helped ..I believe being honest is helpful
thanks
aunteegem@yahoo.com

won said...

My tip would be to take a moment and calm and center yourself beforehand....and then just do it! Remember you are the adult and you are setting the tone for what follows. All in all, it was always worse in my imagination than it was in how it really played out.

And then, have a glass of wine :)

won said...

http://twitter.com/won2x/status/219215723191484417

Thank you.

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